The near future of Wireless technology : Wi-Fi 802.11ax

wireless technologyEach time we download an application, browse the Internet, read an email or watch something on YouTube on our smartphones, we’re using some type of wireless technology. For mobile networks this means 3G or 4G LTE. However, when it comes to our home or work environment, we’re probably using Wi-Fi.

From 802.11a, endorsed in the 90s (reaching speeds of up to 54 Mbps over 5 GHz radio waves) to the current range of 802.11ac routers (up to 1.3 Gbps over a 5 GHz band and 450 Mbps over 2.4 GHz), many things have changed. (more…)

Alicia Ruppel: Alicia is a Sociologist and is part of the Teldat’s Corporate Marketing Department. Within this department she is especially  involved in Design and Events, among other corporate marketing areas

ALL IP by the short hairs – Part 2

all ipThe following example will probably clarify the issue we had last week regarding the alternative approaches to ALL IP solution. A system which is automatically provisioned with basic functions such as Internet access, registering SIP/VoIP accounts, and a setup for basic telephony should also provide Wi-Fi for guests and business partners.


Bernd Buettner:

The Postman always rings twice

wifi for hotelsProviding a wireless LAN for guests and customers is mandatory in many economic sectors where various business interests are pursued. In hotels, wireless LAN has been established for a long time. Cafés and system catering try to encourage guests to stay longer by offering wireless LAN and thus increase sales.


Hans-Dieter Wahl: WLAN Business Line Manager

The divine spark – Wireless LAN is in the air

godspotsWireless LAN has been conquering the market for many years by now and still does. This is no news for us. In the business world, Wi-Fi plays a vital part in processes and also in our everyday life hardly anybody can image to living without wireless LAN.

We are used to having Internet access almost anywhere for our mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones. In Germany, free Wi-Fi will soon be offered even in churches around Berlin and Brandenburg. In the first step, 220 churches will offer wireless LAN and the plan is to install Internet services in all 3,000 Protestant churches in the region. The cleverly named project is called “Godspot” and the first hotspot – sorry – Godspot will appear in the famous Französischer Dom in Berlin’s busy Gendarmenmarkt square and the iconic Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin’s Breitscheidplatz.

Godspot’s aim is to build a safe and familiar home for the Protestant Church in the digital world. The places of communication have shifted and much of it now happens in digital social networks. According to the Church, Godspot’s use has no strings attached. There’s no registration, no login, and the Church insists it won’t push advertising or retain users’ personal information. However, when users first sign on, they’ll be taken to a webpage with information on the church building and local parishes.

Legal obstacles to WIFI in German Protestant Church

Germany currently has tough legislation regarding a network provider’s accountability when it comes to the online activities of its users. If, for example, you illegally download software on my network, I face the consequences. Though the German federal government says it’s working to change this legislation, Godspots will be installed prior to any new legislation taking affect. To avoid liability, the Church has appointed a couple of Berlin companies as the service’s legal providers.

Though an estimated 61 percent of Germans are Christian, a report in 2013 by Die Welt claimed that Christians will become a minority within the next two decades. Whether Godspot is an attempt to spread God’s word or an effort to meet the demands of the digital age, Berlin’s churches will surely see an uptick in attendance – if not for the sermons then for surfing the web. However, the end justifies the means as long as the “divine spark” leaps over to the audience.

Business cases for new technologies such as wireless LAN solutions seem to be unlimited and find their way into almost all parts of our daily and even our spiritual life. Teldat as a manufacturer of access points and provider of wireless LAN solutions is looking forward to the future developments of this market.

Heidi Eggerstedt: Heidi Eggerstedt is part of the bintec-elmeg's Marketing Department. Within this department she is responsible for Marketing Documentation and Translations

Multiservice Communications vs Multiple Services with Communications

transport 4g railOver the last few years, we have experienced a very significant advance in the efficiency of transmission over wireless technologies.  Broadband capabilities have increased to the point where they have overtaken cable, ADSL for example, and come close to the experiences of home fiber internet (100Mbps)

The evolution of wireless connectivity has given us the means to provide connectivity to mobile environments such as cars, buses, trains, etc., providing a perfect and fertile ground for the emergence of numerous services based on connectivity.  The appearance of data over cellular networks and smartphones less than 10 years ago (and the subsequent worldwide boom in applications) may serve as an example.  Likewise, broadband in on-board environments will revolutionize the number of applications and services present in transport fleets and other vehicles.

The boom in on-board services is occurring as we speak. During the last 3 years, and in conjunction with broadband, solutions have been developed that range from security applications (CCTV, alarms, controlled start, synchronization with the police, to name but a few), to managing fleets (GPS tracking, communication over data networks, synchronization with road conditions, traffic density, etc.), and driving performance (SAE, speedometer control, fuel consumption, routes, breakdowns, level of occupation, etc.), as well as passenger on-board entertainment, WIFI, messaging, timetables and digital signage.

All these services have one point in common, they need communications.  Up until now, there were two types of architectures:

  • Firstly, those operating fleets who had decided to independently manage their communications, adding emerging services over their multiservice communications platform.
  • Secondly, those operating fleets who had progressively contracted independent services including communications.  We will now look at the advantages and drawbacks of both of them.

Multiple Services with Communications


  • A service provider controls the whole service.  Consequently, the responsibility of how the system operates lies with a single party.
  • Each service needs a dedicated device.  (Applications SW + Communications.)
  • If you want to integrate a new service, you are under the obligation to go to your service provider.
  • The devices are not specifically designed for communications.  Performance is poorer in areas with low coverage, radio behavior, operating functions, etc., and frequently not approved by the connectivity provider.  Who is responsible when there is a drop in communications?  The carrier or the service provider?
  • Difficulty in integrating multiple services.  E.g., on-board entertainment service via WiFi and Internet access over the same radio wave means using the same provider.  (Thus preventing you from choosing the market solutions that best meet your needs.)
  • Complex maintenance and operation.  Management of independent communications with numerous SIMs and devices that behave differently.
  • Installations aren’t shared.  For instance, having multiple antennas and cabling in vehicles restrict changes (perforations, etc.)

Multiple Services Communications


  • A specialized communication device allows both the monitoring and debugging of communication faults.  (Coverage, packet loss, network synchronization, etc.)
  • Just like a router in an office, an on-board router is designed to interconnect different PCs, with QoS mechanisms, FW and monitoring per port, thus debugging service behavior and the interaction between network components.
  • A single and reliable communication device allows the same interface to be shared among various services.  (For example, WiFi services for marketing, entertainment and Internet access.)
  • Simplifies communications maintenance to a single device and one or various pinpointed SIM cards.
  • Sharing of installations: the same antennas are used for different services.
  • Offers scalability, so adding new, emerging and future services is simple.
  • Allows numerous services to be incorporated with independent services (making it possible to choose those that better adapt to each type of solution).
  • Uses devices certified by the carrier, guaranteeing the communication provider is responsible for communication.
  • A service provider does not control the communications.  However, a multiservice platform has certain mechanisms, such as independent management plans, allowing some flexibility in customization through services.
  • Another device is needed in addition to those installed by the service providers.  However, each device with communication, provided by a service provider, has an additional cost to include said communications, which is discountable in this scenario.


In short, if the end client is interested in a single service per vehicle and not future expansion, the option of service with communications would be the best.  However, if, on the other hand, the client wishes to gradually use the newer and improved technologies available, he is better off with an architecture based on a single communications installation (where new services can be added as they are required).

Teldat, as a corporate communications router manufacturer and a major supplier to large telecommunication carriers that offer multiple services using the company’s devices, supports (by means of its on-board Automotive and Rail platforms) the latest technologies providing multiservice communication environments.

Francisco Guerrero: Francisco Guerrero, Telecommunications Engineer, is the Head of Teldat's Product Marketing Department.
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