Long live ALL IP

all ipIt is no new that ISDN will soon be switched off. Up to what point the whole procedure is planned to be done is also well known. There will be no or almost no delay because the necessity on the part of the carriers is clearly articulated and mandatory. Companies are forced to take action sooner rather than later. Two possible solutions are available for the conversion to ALL IP.

It is time for a “new” network

Technically speaking, ISDN stands for Integrated Services Digital Network, from the user’s point of view, a long-standing, stable, and reliable communication network which standardizes a digital telecommunications network and unifies various services such as telephony, data, teletext or datex-P on one single network. Previously, each service required its own network and all networks were connected via gateways.

The term ALL IP means unifying and converting all currently existing transmission technologies in telecommunications networks on the basis of Internet Protocol (IP). Thus, services such as telephony, television and mobile communications will be provided by means of a uniform network protocol and no longer via the classical circuit switching. The switch to IP-based lines significantly reduces the complexity of networks while the number of operating network components decreases.

Migration process

The migration from ISDN to ALL IP initially affects private and small business customer’s point-to-multipoint connections. Business customer’s that frequently used point-to-point connections (buzzword: SIP trunk) are expected to be switched off  by Deutsche Telekom at around the time of CeBIT 2016 and alternative carriers are even one step ahead.

From the end of 2015 Deutsche Telekom offers its business partners up to eight parallel voice channels. Due to regulations, customers with more than ten phone numbers per basic ISDN connection currently have to apply for a second ALL IP connection in order to keep their phone numbers. Hence, it makes sense to actively develop an approach already in the run-up phase or to consider changing to another provider.

When evaluating which decision to take, one should consider how old the current operating PBX is, whether it is worth purchasing a new one, or whether the PBX has only been operating for a few years and it already supports VoIP. In the end a simple, economic cost-benefit analysis needs to be undertaken and an evaluation made.

Two options are available for the switch from ISDN to ALL IP

One solution is the migration of the already existing ISDN infrastructure by means of an ALL IP media gateway and the alternative is the replacement of the PBX by an ALL IP communication solution for both voice and data which can be integrated into the network infrastructure.

Teldat with its very long tradition in the telecommunication and IT market, provides both approaches: migration as well as the integration of an ALL IP communication solution. In our next blog entry we will look further into the available solutions for both approaches.

Bernd Buettner:

ALL IP advances – Deutsche Telekom means business

all ipDeutsche Telekom’s customers have to face the fact that their service provider means business. Over a year ago Germany’s largest service provider started cancelling analog and ISDN connections if their customers refused to migrate their voice connection to VoIP.

The customers had to choose a new tariff otherwise Deutsche Telekom would terminate the contract. The provider’s plan is now to switch its whole network in Germany to ALL IP technology by the end of 2018, although they previously had a more ambitious goal of 2016. All this, without affecting their ongoing business.

However, the switch to this new technology for the service provider Deutsche Telekom, is not the first time and not a single case in Germany. Already in 2013, Deutsche Telekom’s daughter Makedonski Telekom switched its complete telephone network to ALL-IP. During 2014, the network in the Slovak Republic was converted and since the beginning of 2015, Croatia as well as Montenegro were affected, followed by Hungary. By the end of 2018, not only Germany, but also Romania and Greece should have an ALL-IP network.

Migrating all analog and ISDN connections to ALL-IP achieves numerous advantages for the service provider. In particular, a separate phone network no longer has to be maintained. Simply a DSL connection is needed in order to provide the customer with Internet data and telephony which results in notable cost benefits for the service provider. The customer benefits from a better service, shorter time to market and a faster network with less latency. Telephony is carried out via Internet protocol. Broadly speaking, users speak to each other on the phone over the Internet which is called VoIP (Voice over IP). This technology means that fixed telephony no longer has reserved its own frequency band for the voice transmission. Phone calls will be embedded in Internet data (the Internet Protocol – IP) and transmitted together with other Internet data traffic. A splitter separates the connection of the customer into a telephone and a data line. Thus, even during phone calls the user depends on a working DSL connection, which means a working provider software, as well as a satisfactorily high quality DSL connection.

Teldat has looked into the subject of ALL-IP as a whole and is a qualified ALL-IP partner for SMEs and large corporations, including integrators. The manufacturer has come up with various ALL-IP solutions. Looking back on a very long tradition in the telecommunication and IT market, Teldat attracted the service provider Deutsche Telekom as a customer, especially in the new technology ALL-IP.

Heidi Eggerstedt: Heidi Eggerstedt is part of the bintec-elmeg's Marketing Department. Within this department she is responsible for Marketing Documentation and Translations

VoIP Security

voip solutionsSome countries switch off their telephone network in the near future. ALL IP is as previously mentioned one of the main buzz words. The shift to VoIP has already started and now is the right time to ask ourselves: “Do we need VoIP security?”

(more…)

Randolf Mayr:

BYOD and Telephony: integrated solutions and security

The concept of bring your own device BYOD is a growing trend for business IT. There are a variety of benefits allowing users to supply their own PC and mobile devices.

Employees can easily check e-mails, manage appointments via social networks and search the web. Many companies offer their own apps to allow access to corporate data, enterprise applications and enterprise infrastructure.

All IP trend

At the same time the All IP technology trend with its increasing convergence of voice and data allows VoIP Service Providers to support telephony with standard LAN devices as long as it supports the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). In this case BYOD, or bring your own device, is a service that providers offer, allowing users to configure any SIP based device.

There are also free mobile apps and with costs for iOS and Android that enable calls via Wi-Fi and 3G/4G using your VoIP provider.

So what could be more obvious than using a smart phone also as a mobile phone over the wireless LAN in the office. This way some business apps offer convenient telephony with a variety of service functions such as hold, toggling, call transfer and conference calls. Wi-Fi suitable infrastructures allow a high quality of telephony with seamless handover, over the entire wireless LAN. As a further benefit many users have realized that it is possible to have incoming and outgoing business calls at any location within a building offering a good and stable Internet connection.

Where there is light there is also shadow

Many, especially larger companies, have noticed security issues caused by BYOD. However, up to a certain point, they have found a solution thanks to security strategies, using so-called mobile device management (MDM), as well as using a comprehensive data-protection.

SMEs are less experienced in dealing with private IT. Many of the small and medium-sized enterprises don’t know yet how to handle this issue.

The use of VoIP causes particularly in the business sector further serious security problems by opening up the local network for all computers on the Internet. The result is that firewalls for SIP calls have to be opened and thus the use of Internet providers throws the door wide open to attacks from the Internet.

Teldat Solutions

This is where the experience of Teldat will come into complete effect. The solutions which Teldat offer the SME segment contain not only the infrastructure to integrate BYOD devices but allow also a secure integration of telephony. The hybird systems act as local SIP proxies. Hence, SIP apps can connect locally to the hybird systems without any risk. The hybird systems act as a session border controller and connect to the VoIP provider. BYOD devices can make phone calls using their SIP provider without being accessible for the provider or from the Internet .

If you use for example a smart phone outside the company, the key issue for mobile freedom is VoVPN, Voice over Virtual Private Network. The BYOD device establishes via an online Internet connection a secure connection to the office. In our example, the smart phone with VPN and all safety standards carries out all functions as if it were registered on the wireless LAN of the office. Furthermore, the telephone app acts as a normal extension. Outgoing calls display the central phone number of the office.

Randolf Mayr: