Long live ALL IP – Part 2

ALL-IPAs already announced in our previous blog entry, we will have a closer look into the two ALL IP approaches: migrating the ISDN PBX or replacing it via a new IP-based voice and data solution.

Migrating the ISDN PBX

Migration means continuing with the already existing PBX whilst a media gateway takes care of the ISDN connection from the PBX’s point of view. The biggest advantage related to migration is that the PBX remains unaffected. In this process the media gateway will be positioned between PBX and the ALL IP broadband connection.

It is very important to use a professional media gateway unifying all necessary interfaces and features. Sophisticated QoS (quality of services) mechanisms are in this case especially important as it guarantees the required voice quality and the solution’s reliability. One of the basic requirements is of course the available bandwidth. As a rule of thumb, a good voice quality comparable with ISDN can be obtained by allocating 100 kbit/s for each voice channel, bidirectional for up and downstream. Also qualitative parameters such as delay, jitter and an acceptable level of package loss have to be evaluated. For instance, losing 10 coherent data packages at a stretch, can lead to losing 100 to 300 ms of voice information. In order to have a smooth operation for incoming and outbound calls, the media gateway converts ISDN voice data into IP data and vice versa.

The same applies to the communication of the ISDN PBX behind. It is important to note that all data coming from or transmitted to the ALL IP platform has to be conformed and compatible with SIP which is the network protocol being used. SIP (session initiation protocol) is in charge of the control as well as the set up and dismantling of the connection. The voice data as such is transmitted via the real time protocol (RTP). Experience shows that SIP is not the same as VoIP and VoIP is not the same as ALL IP.

A simple example: The ALL IP service provider sends phone numbers in a canonical format which means that the customer number being called is for instance +49-91-196730. Without the media gateway converting the format into 091-196730 before sending it to the ISDN PBX, it is very likely that none of the phones connected to the PBX would ring. Vice versa, the same applies when calls are made from the ISDN network to the IP network.

New ALL IP solution

If the ISDN PBX which is already installed should not migrate due to technical or economic issues, then the PBX has to be replaced and an ALL IP voice data solution has to be found. However, one has to take into account that with an ALL IP solution, not only the PBX may lose functionality, but also the terminals may only be used partially or not at all. In this case new IP terminals have to be integrated. This is a cost factor not to be underestimated, especially in companies with a larger number of digital and often proprietary system terminals. However, a complete and thorough IP-based infrastructure offers plenty of opportunities to optimize working processes and thus achieves an economical benefit.

Numerous features such as DECT over IP, voice mail, IP-based door intercom including camera image of visitors on IP terminals or smart phones can be seamlessly integrated and used via professional ALL IP communication solutions. Now, wireless LAN or HotSpots for guests and customers as well as integration of home offices or mobile employees can be effectively combined.

Teldat as a qualified ALL-IP partner for SMEs, large corporations and integrators has attracted the service provider Deutsche Telekom as a customer by its various ALL-IP solutions for both approaches, migration as well as new ALL-IP solutions.

Michael Bindner:

Dismantling the ISDN and POTS networks

100039145How can we help carriers dismantle their ISDN networks easily, economically and above all, transparently?

Traditional ISDN and POTS communication networks are now obsolete.  Deployments using old technology, the devices making up these networks, etc., have reached, in many cases, the end of their lives.  Another influencing factor is that experts and technicians in this field are approaching, or have even reached, retirement.

However, there are still millions of lines in service and millions of clients who use them on a daily basis, both at home and in companies, not only for voice communications but also for data. Communication carriers, the owners of said networks, are faced with the unavoidable fact that they must replace them with new technology.  The dismantling of the old network goes hand in hand with deploying the new ultra-broadband.

Migration from traditional telephony to IP

The migration of traditional telephony to convergent services based on IP, plays a key role in dismantling the net.  While data has been transmitted over IP for quite some time now, the vast majority of telephony services still continue to use the old ISDN and POTS networks.

One of the most important goals for carriers is to keep their customers during said migration.  The latter, when faced with radical or abrupt changes, may well decide to change providers.  Given this, the change for the end-user must be as transparent and staggered as possible while still meeting customer demands.

This boils down to three main factors:

  • Customers should continue to use their existing voice infrastructure (PBX and phone handsets) for as long as they wish.
  • The new networks retain all the advanced features currently used by said customers
  • Quality of service remains optimum.

Carrier needs

The carrier must be able to efficiently mass deploy the new convergent services.  Integrated with the modern management and installation systems, all featured in ultra-bandwidth networks, the converging infrastructure, usually based on TR-69, must have zero-touch configuration ability.

Moreover, carriers require on-site product lines for customers, which integrate the advanced features of ultra-broadband networks, accessed through corporate devices, together with advanced telephony features: IP switchboards and media gateways for example.  A perfectly integrated ecosystem of features and accessories (IP and DECT telephones, or wireless access points), for both voice and data, together with access routers, provide both customer and carrier with a simple, flexible, professional approach to new fully convergent IP.

The Teldat Grouphas been selected by a major ISDN network carrier, as the principal supplier to enable customer migration from ISDN to IP.  Teldat’s expertise in telephony systems together with their successful range of access routers for carrier managed services, made them the ideal choice.

Eduardo Tejedor: