ALL IP by the short hairs-Part 1

all-ipIf we were to summarize the current situation in the ALL IP market, we would see that the migration from ISDN to ALL IP has reached a stage where the number of IP-based telephone connections has exceeded other fixed-line connections such as analog or ISDN. In contrast to other VoIP/SIP providers, Germany’s largest carrier has not been able to offer SIP trunk connections in the last year, thus many business customers could not migrate from ISDN point-to-point connections to ALL IP.  Another important point to mention is that the offer of cloud-based ICT solutions has increased therefore migration to ALL IP is even possible for non-office environments.

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Michael Bindner:

Long live ALL IP

all ipIt is no new that ISDN will soon be switched off. Up to what point the whole procedure is planned to be done is also well known. There will be no or almost no delay because the necessity on the part of the carriers is clearly articulated and mandatory. Companies are forced to take action sooner rather than later. Two possible solutions are available for the conversion to ALL IP.

It is time for a “new” network

Technically speaking, ISDN stands for Integrated Services Digital Network, from the user’s point of view, a long-standing, stable, and reliable communication network which standardizes a digital telecommunications network and unifies various services such as telephony, data, teletext or datex-P on one single network. Previously, each service required its own network and all networks were connected via gateways.

The term ALL IP means unifying and converting all currently existing transmission technologies in telecommunications networks on the basis of Internet Protocol (IP). Thus, services such as telephony, television and mobile communications will be provided by means of a uniform network protocol and no longer via the classical circuit switching. The switch to IP-based lines significantly reduces the complexity of networks while the number of operating network components decreases.

Migration process

The migration from ISDN to ALL IP initially affects private and small business customer’s point-to-multipoint connections. Business customer’s that frequently used point-to-point connections (buzzword: SIP trunk) are expected to be switched off  by Deutsche Telekom at around the time of CeBIT 2016 and alternative carriers are even one step ahead.

From the end of 2015 Deutsche Telekom offers its business partners up to eight parallel voice channels. Due to regulations, customers with more than ten phone numbers per basic ISDN connection currently have to apply for a second ALL IP connection in order to keep their phone numbers. Hence, it makes sense to actively develop an approach already in the run-up phase or to consider changing to another provider.

When evaluating which decision to take, one should consider how old the current operating PBX is, whether it is worth purchasing a new one, or whether the PBX has only been operating for a few years and it already supports VoIP. In the end a simple, economic cost-benefit analysis needs to be undertaken and an evaluation made.

Two options are available for the switch from ISDN to ALL IP

One solution is the migration of the already existing ISDN infrastructure by means of an ALL IP media gateway and the alternative is the replacement of the PBX by an ALL IP communication solution for both voice and data which can be integrated into the network infrastructure.

Teldat with its very long tradition in the telecommunication and IT market, provides both approaches: migration as well as the integration of an ALL IP communication solution. In our next blog entry we will look further into the available solutions for both approaches.

Bernd Buettner:

ALL IP advances – Deutsche Telekom means business

all ipDeutsche Telekom’s customers have to face the fact that their service provider means business. Over a year ago Germany’s largest service provider started cancelling analog and ISDN connections if their customers refused to migrate their voice connection to VoIP.

The customers had to choose a new tariff otherwise Deutsche Telekom would terminate the contract. The provider’s plan is now to switch its whole network in Germany to ALL IP technology by the end of 2018, although they previously had a more ambitious goal of 2016. All this, without affecting their ongoing business.

However, the switch to this new technology for the service provider Deutsche Telekom, is not the first time and not a single case in Germany. Already in 2013, Deutsche Telekom’s daughter Makedonski Telekom switched its complete telephone network to ALL-IP. During 2014, the network in the Slovak Republic was converted and since the beginning of 2015, Croatia as well as Montenegro were affected, followed by Hungary. By the end of 2018, not only Germany, but also Romania and Greece should have an ALL-IP network.

Migrating all analog and ISDN connections to ALL-IP achieves numerous advantages for the service provider. In particular, a separate phone network no longer has to be maintained. Simply a DSL connection is needed in order to provide the customer with Internet data and telephony which results in notable cost benefits for the service provider. The customer benefits from a better service, shorter time to market and a faster network with less latency. Telephony is carried out via Internet protocol. Broadly speaking, users speak to each other on the phone over the Internet which is called VoIP (Voice over IP). This technology means that fixed telephony no longer has reserved its own frequency band for the voice transmission. Phone calls will be embedded in Internet data (the Internet Protocol – IP) and transmitted together with other Internet data traffic. A splitter separates the connection of the customer into a telephone and a data line. Thus, even during phone calls the user depends on a working DSL connection, which means a working provider software, as well as a satisfactorily high quality DSL connection.

Teldat has looked into the subject of ALL-IP as a whole and is a qualified ALL-IP partner for SMEs and large corporations, including integrators. The manufacturer has come up with various ALL-IP solutions. Looking back on a very long tradition in the telecommunication and IT market, Teldat attracted the service provider Deutsche Telekom as a customer, especially in the new technology ALL-IP.

Heidi Eggerstedt: Heidi Eggerstedt is part of the bintec-elmeg's Marketing Department. Within this department she is responsible for Marketing Documentation and Translations

R.I.P. ISDN

toipWe live in a digital world. Entertainment, work, information, social relations… today everything is digital. The benefits are obvious. Digital information is much easier to store, transfer and handle than analog and is more powerful.  If we think about it we can find many fields where digitalization has had a remarkable impact. In this article, however, we will only consider the impact on telephone networks.

Regardless of whether the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell or Antonio Meucci (or…), it is clear that it started out as analog, and it remained so for many years. Logically, improvements were made over the years but being inherently analog in operation until the mid-60s, deficiencies in the quality of transmitted voice were inevitable. This was especially the case over long distances that required signal regeneration at intermediate stages, leading to information loss and the introduction of noise. The digitalization of the telephone network was a breakthrough in this regard, since the digital signal is transmitted unchanged regardless of the distance and of the intermediate stages required between sender and receiver.

Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)

While the move to a digital network paved the way for its use with a range of other services in addition to voice, the final leg, the last mile, also needed to be digital. This step took place many years later with Integrated Services Digital Network, ISDN. As the name suggests, ISDN allows different services to be used over the telephone network on a single line, digital of course.

The advantages of ISDN are clear: firstly, the sound quality (which is why even today they are still widely used by the radio industry), secondly, the extra features (rapid call setup, support for multiple terminals on the same line or direct inward dialing and caller ID), and thirdly, the additional services such as data or video transmission.

ISDN was introduced by CCITT (ITU-T) in 1988 and had its golden moment during the 90s, being deployed with varying success in countries around the world such as Japan, Australia, India and the United States. The biggest impact was in Europe, however, in countries like Norway, Denmark, Switzerland and above all Germany, which had 25 million channels (29% penetration) and one in five lines installed worldwide.

In the late 90s and early twenty-first century two events mark the decline of ISDN; on the one hand, ISDN cannot keep up with market demands for greater speed, and on the other, the cost of Digital Signal Processors (DSP), which allow more advanced line modulations, lowers significantly. It is the beginning of ADSL and the decline of ISDN.

ISDN, the new paradigm in communications

During the first decade of the twenty-first century, ISDN gradually loses ground to ADSL and from 2010 all ISDN service carriers gradually announce its withdrawal. In 2010, for example, NTT announces its intention to migrate all ISDN phone lines in Japan to IP technologies, in 2013 Verizon decides not to install anymore ISDN lines in the USA and in 2015 BT announces its intention to discontinue the network in the UK. Curiously, however, Deutsche Telekom (DT) in Germany adopts the most aggressive stance. By far the world’s largest ISDN provider, it has already begun migration to ADSL/IP technologies having set an aggressive horizon of 2018 for cutting off ISDN completely.

All carriers with active ISDN networks will no doubt be following the transition of the German DT network very closely and it will likely mark the way forward. DT’s commitment is to network modernization and improving customer service while minimizing the impact on the customer. The proposal, therefore, is to offer data services and voice over IP on the same telephone line (ADSL/VDSL) but at the same time giving the customer the opportunity to keep their existing ISDN infrastructure, emulating the ISDN lines from the EDC to their current ISDN PBX.

The use of xDSL and IP services allowing the customer to maintain their internal ISDN infrastructure practically eliminates any impact on the customer, who controls the evolution of the network to an integrated and up-to-date service.

This is an ambitious project and key for Deutsche Telekom. For this reason, following a rigorous selection process, the company has forged close relationships with partners who have proven ability in providing the solvency, experience and agility needed. Within this framework, Teldat has been entrusted by Deutsche Telekom with the task of supplying the access devices.

Marcel Gil: SD-WAN Business Line Manager

VoIP Security

voip solutionsSome countries switch off their telephone network in the near future. ALL IP is as previously mentioned one of the main buzz words. The shift to VoIP has already started and now is the right time to ask ourselves: “Do we need VoIP security?”

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Randolf Mayr:
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