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Peer-to-peer networks

Peer-to-peer networkCryptocurrencies have been hailed as one of the greatest technological revolutions of recent years. Bitcoin is the pioneer and best-known of them, but there are hundreds more – each with different characteristics, objectives and technologies behind them to make them work.

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How did Blockchain commence?

As we previously mentioned in an article published in June 2019, the Bitcoin did not create a new computer technology but integrated a series of pre-existing techniques in a revolutionary manner. The possibilities this protocol could bring were soon condensed in a new disruptive paradigm known as BLOCKCHAIN.
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All gigabit accesses are born (free?) and equal…

gfastWhen gigabit accesses are mentioned, the first thing that comes to mind for most of us (especially in Spain) is a fibre-optic access network for speeds beyond 50Mb. Carriers take the optical fibre to your home, install an ONT and that’s it. Customers can choose between 100Mbps, 300Mbps, 600Mbps and even 1Gbps plans, depending on what they’re willing to pay. If there is no fibre coverage at your place, the best you can hope for is a DSL access.

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Why Apache Kafka?

softwareThese days, numerous applications follow a microservices architecture. And many applications manage large amounts of data (user activity on the application, logs, metrics, etc.) that are constantly travelling back and forth between microservices. This can produce a series of problems when it comes to integrating all this information – such as the synchronization, scaling and processing of the data.

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In the beginning there was BITCOIN

ITFew things have spurred as much interest in the ICT sector in recent times as Blockchain technology. It stems from an article titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” published on May 24, 2008 by a certain Satoshi Nakamoto[1] , along with a computer application launched a few months later (November 1, 2008).

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A plate full of symbols

electronic ITJust by looking at the bottom or rear part of an electronic IT device (such as a computer, router, monitor, etc.) or its accessories (mouse, keyboard or power source), we can identify a common feature: all of them have an identifying plate full of symbols. Each represents the product’s conformity with a series of rules or regulations applicable in a given country or economic area.

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